• Visit to House of Representatives

    The Dutch-Turkish (trade) relations are of great importance. This is acknowledged in the Dutch House of Representatives (Tweede Kamer) when the book ‘400 years of official relations between Turkeye and the Netherlands’ is handed over to Jan Klink.

    Dutch export is about 5 BLN. Many Dutch entrepreneurs are already active in Turkiye – and vice versa. A good conversation between Jan Klink (liberal VVD) and Ethem Emre, chairman of the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands-Turkiye foundation, took place (16-11) about how trade can be facilitated even better.
    To be continued.
  • Dutch agri-fresh trademission on Turkish TV

    The Agri-fresh trade mission organized by the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands – Turkey foundation in collaboration with partners DTTC and Raad International did not go unnoticed by Turkish TRT television.
    The delegation was welcomed with open arms because the participating Dutch companies represent a total turnover of +/- € 575 MLN, which corresponds to the six-monthly Turkish Agri export in 2021.
    In the TRT interview, the chairman of the Chamber, Mr Ethem Emre, is interviewed at the Interfresh Eurasia fair in Antalya.

     

     

     

  • The grass (and gaz) is greener across the border

    Entrepreneurs are under pressure because of the lacking of available human capital, affordable energy sources and reliable supply chains. Read article ‘The grass (and gas) is cheaper across the border’ published in MKB Rotterdam Rijnmond magazine (SterkR) sent to 14,000 companies/entrepreneurs in the region Rotterdam.
    Cheaper production of the same (or better) quality is a plus, especially in times of high energy prices and less reliable supply chains. That is why a group of Dutch producers travels to Turkiye every year. About 3000 Dutch companies are already established there.
    Turkiye keeps Dutch companies fit and vital. Why? Because more and more sectors are subject to growth ceilings, because the stretch is out, or because of a shortage of (labour) resources. Subsequently, entrepreneurs are seeking partners internationally.
    The explosion in gas prices in the Netherlands has made some Agri-fresh growers decide to leave the greenhouses empty this winter. Other sectors in Western Europe are also considering scaling down productions, which will affect related sectors in the Netherlands. It encourages entrepreneurs to roll out sustainable strategies.
    What kind of entrepreneurs will join the delegation of CCNT at the end of October 2022? Fruit & vegetables, logistics, engineering/components and an entrepreneur from the furniture/interior industry. Other sectors will be facilitated later in a separate trade mission.
    The success of the previous trade mission resulted in relevant contacts, contracts and even national attention on Turkish TV. Please note: let yourself be guided by a Dutch-speaking, local trade expert with an office in Istanbul or Rotterdam.
    Article written by Peter Wolters, vice-chairman of the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands – Turkiye foundation. Also sparring partner sustainability, digitization and international positioning.
    Read SterkR magazine, page 21.

  • HealthCare project NL-TR on Turkish TV

    The Turkish media reacted quickly to the press release “Turkish Care Capacity for Dutch Queue” published on December 8, 2021. The chairman of the Ethem Emre foundation was broadcasted via live streaming in a TV studio in Turkey (topic “Global interest in the Turkish health system” ) were asked to provide more information about the motivation behind the NL-TR Care Project.

    The Dutch healthcare sector ran into capacity limits during the corona crisis, according to the filling of the IC departments. Planned care has also been partially postponed. The Dutch Healthcare Authority (NZa) announced at the end of August that around 340,000 to 380,000 fewer operations had been performed since March 2020 than expected. The ‘transfer’ of Dutch patients to Turkish hospitals is currently being investigated by the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands – Turkey foundation.
  • Apple removes iPhones from Turkish webshops due to lira crisis

    Apple products are not for sale in Turkish web shops (Nov. 2021). Due to the fall of the Turkish lira, local prices are suddenly 10% lower than those in the US. The lira has already fallen 45% this year. The national Dutch financial journal (Financieel Dagblad – FD) asked the opinion of the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands-Turkey foundation…
    The chairman of the foundation says that it is not a disaster scenario. Ethem Emre: ‘Turkey has gone through a crisis before and then has recovered, the country is resilient.” He cites that in October, the World Bank revised its growth forecast for Turkey’s gross domestic product upwards. The forecast now stands at 8.5%.
    A salesperson told Reuters news agency that due to inflation, consumers view electronics not only as a commodity, but also as an investment.
    Read the full article.
  • Turkish TV covers Dutch trademission

    Turkish TV broadcasted the Dutch trade mission of the CCNT foundation. The TRT Haber (Turkish ‘NOS’) nicely presented the Dutch fruit & vegetable producers/investors in their media.

    With this initiative, the Chamber of Commerce Netherlands-Turkey Foundation has exhibited Dutch companies to potential Turkish trading partners.

     

    Translation of Turkish TV newsreader:

    “In Antalya, the local produce fair ‘Yörex’ has opened its doors to its visitors for the 11th time, 18 October 2021. The host facilitated an important gathering between Dutch companies from the fresh fruit and vegetable sector and their business partners.

    Formerly known as the Silk Road, now known as the ‘One Belt One Road’ (OBOR) formed by China, the Netherlands as the most famous country in the agricultural sector of Europe and Turkey with its excellent trading position in terms of geographical position met in Antalya to further develop a trade volume of more than 20 billion per year.

    Dutch business people met their partners on location at Turkish products and also visited Yörex, the local products fair.

    Ethem Emre, chairman of the Netherlands-Turkey Chamber of Commerce foundation: “With the aim of explaining agriculture in Turkey to producers, exporters and importers from the Netherlands, we came here with 11 companies.”

    Fred van der Weijde, board member of the Chamber of Commerce: “It is a great organization here and we are very happy to be here. What beautiful products they have. And everybody is interested. Now we are doing everything to work together. We expect good results.”

    Anton Filippo, trade participant: “To be invited for the first time, I don’t have much experience in Turkey, but my first impression is: fantastic! There are many opportunities for us Dutch companies in this area of ​​Turkey. I see myself coming back very soon.”

    The intention is that cooperation between Turkey and the Netherlands will continue and that Turkey’s products will become a trademark in Europe.”

    Visits to local companies were organised by the chamber to greenhouses with an impressive 200 HA among which in Isparta, Antalya and surroundings including Fineke (citrus; bananas; capsicum/peppers; tomatoes; potatoes). Textile and IT companies were also on the B2B matching program in Istanbul and Denizli.

    Interested in a next trade mission? Contact info [at] kvknederlandturkije.nl.

  • NOS: lawsuit travel industry incorrect travel advice government

    More than 70 travel organizations call on the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to immediately adjust the travel advice and to distinguish between vaccinated travelers and other travelers.

    A country will then receive a yellow or green travel advice if you have been vaccinated or recovered from Covid. This is already happening for countries within the EU and it is high time that this is also applied outside the EU, according to the travel sector.

    Current travel advice dates from the time when there were no vaccines and is outdated. Current travel advice does not take into account the protective effect of vaccination and incorrectly informs travelers. The Dutch have the right to up-to-date, fair and reliable travel advice. The current incorrect travel advice is also causing great damage to the sector. This is especially culpable now that the corona support has been discontinued as of October 1.

    The CCNT endorses this initiative since well informed, responsible, healthy travelling facilitates international trade.

    View Dutch NOS TV

    Contact initiator lawsuit: Joshua van Eijndhoven – rechtszaak@voja.travel

  • Anadolu Agency: Dutch DFI

    Dutch direct foreign investments are apparently known in Turkey. The ‘Turkish ANP’ Anadulu Agency published a news overview about current Dutch participations in, among other sectors, renewable energy, agri sector and regional development.

    The Chamber of Commerce foundation was asked to provide an evaluation of priorities and current Dutch investments in Turkey, which Anadulu Agency in turn interpreted and published.

    ….read more

  • Dutch Companies Finds Turkey Again

    Turkey is again becoming popular with Dutch companies and entrepreneurs. That is what the CCNT told BNR radio. The diplomatic row between the Netherlands and Turkey, in which a Turkish minister was expelled from the country almost a year ago, was a low point, says the Chamber.

    But the organization is now seeing a growing number of requests to do business, both from the Netherlands and from Turkey. Every week, ten Dutch people start a company in Turkey, just as many as the other way around. According to Ethem Emre, chairman of the CCNT, the lack of the feared sanctions after last year’s diplomatic crisis has limited the damage. As a result, the number of applications to the CCNT was already on the rise quite quickly. In the meantime, the diplomatic row itself has almost been settled, Emre reports.

    Distrust not completely gone yet

    However, the mutual mistrust has not completely disappeared, notes Danny Casimir, owner of Splexs, a platform that connects retailers with Turkish textile suppliers. It is still difficult for the latter group to obtain a visa. General confidence in Turkey grew again, which, according to Emre, has a positive effect on the number of Dutch holidays in the country. The Turkish economy also did well with a growth of 7 percent last year, largely due to agriculture and textiles.

    Especially the development around ‘fast fashion’, where fashion companies change their collection very quickly, has a favorable effect. From a logistical point of view, Turkey offers many advantages in this area, especially with large factories that can switch quickly and deliver cheaply. The costs are low, but the question is whether it is all equally reliable what comes from Turkey; child labor and poor working conditions are lurking.